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Thread: [Cash] Munna Bank

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    pink ball Mistral's Avatar
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    Default [Cash] Munna Bank

    haha get it, munna bank because it's a cash submission and will put more money into my URPG bank account. haha.

    Okay, awful jokes aside, wanted to experiment with oil pastels I got, this was the result. Lesson learned was that they work better on larger pieces, so noted for next time I do something with oil pastels. Just submitting this for cash for the time being because I don't think I'll pass this at Medium. (But boy, it'd be hilarious if I did.)


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    Steel Soul Design TeamURPG StaffAdministratorSuper Moderator K'sariya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mistral View Post
    haha get it, munna bank because it's a cash submission and will put more money into my URPG bank account. haha.

    Okay, awful jokes aside, wanted to experiment with oil pastels I got, this was the result. Lesson learned was that they work better on larger pieces, so noted for next time I do something with oil pastels. Just submitting this for cash for the time being because I don't think I'll pass this at Medium. (But boy, it'd be hilarious if I did.)

    Claiming!

  3. #3
    Steel Soul Design TeamURPG StaffAdministratorSuper Moderator K'sariya's Avatar
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    Lemme tell you, oil pastels are a pain--good on you for giving them a solid try. They're one of the least flexible mediums that I can think of, and one of the more messy ones. Their oily waxiness makes them difficult to correct or erase, so even deciding to use them is super bold.

    So to start off with one of the bigger things, which I'm sure you accidentally learned the hard way: if the back side of that folder doesn't have the raised sticker on the front, I'd suggest using that flat side instead. The raised part of the sticker has created those lines that you see that dominate the background, which is otherwise nicely colored with your well-chosen shade of blue.

    One of the things I love about this is the concept. Munna and Musharna are some weird pig/elephant based creatures, so the idea of using them as a piggy bank is adorable. Munna definitely has the perfect shape for it. The video games do cute things like this all of the time--the Wailmer Pail, the Squirt Bottle. Items like that really help cement a world who have Pokemon in the same way that we have animals. It's a small little bit of world-building that I particularly enjoy! You always have adorable concepts.

    Munna as a Pokemon has incredibly simple anatomy. You've done well on it here! Even though fine details are hard with the blunt end of oil pastels, you've managed to detail in its little eyelashes, which is a cute touch! It took me a sec to figure out your color scheme. I looked up the shiny, but then realized that it's not the shiny, but money-colored, which was a nice discovery.

    As far as your perspective and form goes, it's nice to see you go for a different perspective! The angle of the chairs and the table shows that. One thing with perspective, though, is that as long as the "camera" is upright, the lines of vertical objects will always remain straight up and down. This means that despite the perspective, your chair and table legs will always be at a perfect vertical, straight up and down. The only one that's really off is the chair on the rest, but the others you've done pretty well on for free-handing with something like oil pastels, which is good to see!

    On top of the objects, the perspective is a little differently. The way I learned it is using two-point perspective, which is the technique that is based on there being two points on a horizon at the eye-height of the viewer from which lines radiate outward. This is how you dictate the perspective of flat objects on a plane. Generally, the idea is that on your chairs, the side of the seat furthest away from us will be slightly more narrow than the side that's nearest to us. Here's of a basic example of a chair on one of these two-point perspective grids. I sketch these all of the time while trying to draw something at a difficult perspective, even if it's not a flat shape! Here is another cool, more varied image that makes use of the gridlines, which are ghosted on top of it. Notice how the near side of the bed is wider than the far side, and how the angles of the sides aren't parallel with the one opposite of it. They all taper slightly inward.

    This approach is great for making your objects believably fit on a plane. It's honestly one of the hardest parts--even after learning this, I had to do a ton of practice. It's not something we realize very intuitively! Lightly sketching lines like this with a pencil is a great way to start off, and then erase them later. You can start by choosing two points on the left and on the right in the middle of the page, and then doing some starbursting lines from them. They don't have to be perfect, as they're just guidelines!

    For how precarious oil pastels are, you've done really well with them! Watch where the colors meet; you have to be very particular about how you mark when you have to mark next to a different color, as you probably found out when coloring the Munna's green and the way the black got mixed into it. Sometimes, tearing out small, rough pieces of paper or tissue paper and covering parts you don't want to smear helps keep you from overlapping.

    I know that oil pastel is nigh impossible to improve on without redoing, so the suggestions that I'm giving are more of a "things to watch out for in the future." I'd love to see you try out using a perspective grid (you don't have to show it, but practicing with it would be great! The sketchbook is also a great way to do that in a way that's non-committal and has freedom!). Be a little more careful with your straight lines and the angles that they're at. You can use a lot of things as straight-edges--heck, even that folder your drawing on might work as one! Try out different things to get those little details. For now, this'll be depositing Easiest, 3k into your Munna bank, please!

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